Black spots exi blurb light.jpg
One year on
One year on

Prem maya Tamang, a young Nepali girl stands amongst the rubble of her village in the foothills of the himalayas in the remote district Ramechap, almost a year to the day after the earthquake. Most of the affected areas still lie in ruin as reconstruction efforts have been left almost entirely to local people and determined small NGO's.

On our own
On our own

Due to sheer remoteness and difficulty of access, many of the worst hit areas have become 'black spots' in aid, with no large international aid group or governmental relief reaching some of the most desperately in need. The result is that many families are still living in makeshift shelters of corrugated iron and tarpaulin.

Memories of you
Memories of you

Khadka weeps as she arranges photographs of her late husband and injured son in her new home. After losing the family home in the earthquake, Khadka and family received help from a small NGO to build a new home. Sadly, six weeks after completion her husband passed away.  Shortly after her only son, then the designated bread winner was involved in a serious work accident. She is now unable to pay for the operation he needs and he risks losing his hand. 'I don't know what to do. I have no support'.

It's not the same without you here
It's not the same without you here

Khadka's son Suman's bed lies empty whilst he is in a hospital in Kathmandu awaiting an operation that may not come.

Rebuilding the monastery
Rebuilding the monastery

Lama Geishe Jimpa, a high-standing monk from Kopan Monastery in Kathmandu, walks amongst the foundations of the Buddhist monastery in the very remote Himalayan village of Wafal, Sindhulpowchuk. Despite losing many homes, their school and their monastery the village have received no governmental aid. All their rebuild efforts have been left to local people, the monastery and small local & international NGO’s.

Far and away
Far and away

Following the destruction of their school in the devastating earthquake over a year ago these boys spend their days helping family do odd jobs and agricultural work. The closest school is now a 3 1/2 hour trek through the precipitous mountain trails and their family cannot afford supplies for their studies even if they were to make that lengthy journey.

It all lies in ruin
It all lies in ruin

One of the central building of Priti village, Ramechap district,  lies in ruin a year on from the earthquake. It's unlikely it will be rebuilt.

By our hands only
By our hands only

Locals build a road up the mounatin, no aid has reached here so they have taken it upon themselves to do the work.

March of the children
March of the children

School children line up, ready to walk as a parade through the mountain paths to the opening of their new school in Pritee village, Ramechap. Many of these children had been walking 2 to 3 hours along steep mountain paths to attend a temporary school since last year's earthquake. The new school was funded by a small international NGO, as the village is yet to receive any government aid.

School girls gather around a drinking fountain
School girls gather around a drinking fountain

Ramechap District, Nepal - in the foothills Himalayas.

Perner
Perner

This is Perner, he is 11 years old. Shortly after the earthquake his father committed suicide following a mental breakdown. He is now the sole breadwinner in the family and has to leave school to tend the fields and support his family. Mental health issues are becoming an increasing problem with families becoming desperate about their fate.  If aid does not reach families that desperately need it, more will suffer a similar fate to young Perner.

Remains of the day
Remains of the day

A street child sifts through the run off water from a recent cremation at Pashupati temple, the world’s largest outdoor crematorium.Amongst the most vulnerable, at risk and least likely to see any of the benefit of aid directly or indirectly, are the street children. Already a major issue in Nepal, particularly Kathmandu, the number of street children has risen dramatically since the earthquake. Startling increases in the trafficking of women and children, orphaned children and destitute families unable to house or support themselves are all contributing to the exponential increase of children on the street.

Black spots exi blurb light.jpg
One year on
On our own
Memories of you
It's not the same without you here
Rebuilding the monastery
Far and away
It all lies in ruin
By our hands only
March of the children
School girls gather around a drinking fountain
Perner
Remains of the day
One year on

Prem maya Tamang, a young Nepali girl stands amongst the rubble of her village in the foothills of the himalayas in the remote district Ramechap, almost a year to the day after the earthquake. Most of the affected areas still lie in ruin as reconstruction efforts have been left almost entirely to local people and determined small NGO's.

On our own

Due to sheer remoteness and difficulty of access, many of the worst hit areas have become 'black spots' in aid, with no large international aid group or governmental relief reaching some of the most desperately in need. The result is that many families are still living in makeshift shelters of corrugated iron and tarpaulin.

Memories of you

Khadka weeps as she arranges photographs of her late husband and injured son in her new home. After losing the family home in the earthquake, Khadka and family received help from a small NGO to build a new home. Sadly, six weeks after completion her husband passed away.  Shortly after her only son, then the designated bread winner was involved in a serious work accident. She is now unable to pay for the operation he needs and he risks losing his hand. 'I don't know what to do. I have no support'.

It's not the same without you here

Khadka's son Suman's bed lies empty whilst he is in a hospital in Kathmandu awaiting an operation that may not come.

Rebuilding the monastery

Lama Geishe Jimpa, a high-standing monk from Kopan Monastery in Kathmandu, walks amongst the foundations of the Buddhist monastery in the very remote Himalayan village of Wafal, Sindhulpowchuk. Despite losing many homes, their school and their monastery the village have received no governmental aid. All their rebuild efforts have been left to local people, the monastery and small local & international NGO’s.

Far and away

Following the destruction of their school in the devastating earthquake over a year ago these boys spend their days helping family do odd jobs and agricultural work. The closest school is now a 3 1/2 hour trek through the precipitous mountain trails and their family cannot afford supplies for their studies even if they were to make that lengthy journey.

It all lies in ruin

One of the central building of Priti village, Ramechap district,  lies in ruin a year on from the earthquake. It's unlikely it will be rebuilt.

By our hands only

Locals build a road up the mounatin, no aid has reached here so they have taken it upon themselves to do the work.

March of the children

School children line up, ready to walk as a parade through the mountain paths to the opening of their new school in Pritee village, Ramechap. Many of these children had been walking 2 to 3 hours along steep mountain paths to attend a temporary school since last year's earthquake. The new school was funded by a small international NGO, as the village is yet to receive any government aid.

School girls gather around a drinking fountain

Ramechap District, Nepal - in the foothills Himalayas.

Perner

This is Perner, he is 11 years old. Shortly after the earthquake his father committed suicide following a mental breakdown. He is now the sole breadwinner in the family and has to leave school to tend the fields and support his family. Mental health issues are becoming an increasing problem with families becoming desperate about their fate.  If aid does not reach families that desperately need it, more will suffer a similar fate to young Perner.

Remains of the day

A street child sifts through the run off water from a recent cremation at Pashupati temple, the world’s largest outdoor crematorium.Amongst the most vulnerable, at risk and least likely to see any of the benefit of aid directly or indirectly, are the street children. Already a major issue in Nepal, particularly Kathmandu, the number of street children has risen dramatically since the earthquake. Startling increases in the trafficking of women and children, orphaned children and destitute families unable to house or support themselves are all contributing to the exponential increase of children on the street.

show thumbnails